(What You Need To Have Before Your New Puppy Comes Home) (Complete Guide for New Puppy)

(What You Need To Have Before Your New Puppy Comes Home) (Complete Guide for New Puppy)

It’s the most beautiful day of the year! It’s not Christmas, New Years or your birthday. This is the day that you bring home your puppy.

what you need to have before your new puppy comes home: doggrooming.guru

You did your research and picked the puppy. You have new toys, a collar and a tag with the name of your pup in shiny new letters. You have made an appointment to see the vet and found the best place for him to play. All is set for your furry friend to move into his new home.

Related article: How to Groom a new puppy at home?

For you, this may be a time for planning and expectation, but for your puppy, it’s all new and exciting and can be scary. Don’t worry! You can help your puppy adjust to his new home by doing many things with him and his family.

What to Buy for Your Puppy

Before you drive to pick up your new friend, you should have some items on hand. There are also some things that you must purchase for your puppy. These items will be a great help in the first few days of your dog’s life.

A CRATE TO YOUR PUPPY- HOW BIG SHOULD MY PUPY’S CRATE BE?

Get them a crate that is comfortable for them. Small puppies don’t require Great Dane-sized kennels. Great Dane puppies will only get larger. Your puppy will be happy if there is enough space. If your puppy has too little space, he will feel uncomfortable when he is sleeping or kenneled.

To make your puppy feel safe, you can cover the crate with blankets for sleep and bedtime. Your puppy will feel safe and secure in the crate. He will learn to trust you and rely on your care. While it might be cheaper to sleep in a separate room, leaving your puppy alone in the crate can cause him to become anxious, get into accidents, or feel lonely.

PUPPY TOYS But SAFE TOYS

Play is the best way for puppies to learn. Having stimulating toys to play with and to keep him entertained and happy is a great way to bond with him. You can choose a few toys you feel will be useful for your puppy and buy them as soon as he arrives at your house. You’ll give your puppy a wide range of toys to choose from at his new home.

AGE APPROPRIATE FOOD FOR PUPPIES 

Ask the shelter or breeder what the pups have eaten. You can then purchase the same bag and keep it handy at home. When it comes time to introduce your dog to his new home, there is nothing better than good food and some fun! You can save yourself the hassle of running to the store every day your pup is at home looking for the right brand.

If you change their food source too fast, your puppy could have serious digestive problems. Choose a brand recommended by your vet that is specifically made for puppies. Introduce new foods gradually to help them get used to it.

COLLAR, LEASH and NAME TAG – Oh My!

Your new puppy may already have a collar by the time he arrives home. Make sure it is adjustable so that they can wear it as they get older. Before you bring your puppy home, make sure you get a collar and leash you like.

Although your dog will not run away, it’s a good idea to have a name tag with his name and you along with your number. This name tag can be used to identify your puppy and can be attached immediately to his collar when you pick him from the shelter.

ODDS AND ENDS – PUPPY PADS and SPRAYS – TREATS, DISHES and GATES

You can add a few more items to your shopping list to ensure your pup is ready when he arrives. You can get pads for accidents and spot begone spray to eliminate any odors caused by mishaps. Good, age-appropriate treats are essential for training. A baby gate is a simple and affordable way to keep your puppy safe in areas or stairs.

CHECKLIST – PUPPY SUPPLIES

Toys

Foods that are age-appropriate

Collar

Leash

Tags

Bowls of food and water

Puppy pads

Spot cleaner spray

Treats that are age-appropriate

Gate for baby or dog

How to Pick Your Puppy Up

It’s the big day! You are about to embark on a journey to pick up your furry friend. Here are some tips to help you know what to pack and how to introduce yourself to the puppy. First impressions are crucial!

LETTING YOUR PUPPY LEARN ITS SCENT WITH SNIFFS and SNUGGLES

When you pick up your dog, let him sniff you as often as possible. This will allow him to become familiar with your scent. You may be able to bring a t-shirt that smells just like you to the shelter or breeder where your puppy lives so that they are more familiar with your scent.

If possible, allow them to sit on your lap once you are in the car. If they are not able to sit on your lap, you can place them in a travel kennel. Talk to them in your car to reassure them and to get to know your voice.

POTTY TRAINING YOUR NEW PUPPY

As a pet owner, house training your dog can be one of the most difficult tasks. You can start by taking your dog to the outside toilet as soon as you return home. You can ride in the car for either a short or long time to get things moving and to make sure they go to the bathroom as soon as you are done.

You will want to take them to the place you would like them to use for long-term potty training. To help your child cement the idea, be patient. Soon they will be able to understand the concept and will want to go outside to do business.

START SMALL – PUPPY PROOFING AND RESISTING OVERLOAD

Puppy’s are babies, so don’t try to have too many things going at once. When you introduce your puppy to your home, make sure it is a small area that he can feel at ease in. Make sure your home has been puppy-proofed. Your pup’s freedom of movement in your home can cause him to become overwhelmed and even be afraid. Begin with the puppy-proofing area and then work your way up.

SOCIALIZING YOUR PUPY – ONE-ON-One INTRODUCTIONS

It can be difficult to calm down and figure out what to do when a puppy is first brought home. Instead of allowing everyone to swarm him, you should meet him in person in the place where he will be living.

POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT: STOP YOUR PUPPY BITE, NIPPING AND CHEWING

Puppies learn fast! Positive reinforcement and treats can help puppies learn quickly. Make sure your puppy-proof area is clean and free from chewing, biting or nipping. Positive reinforcement will set your puppy up for a successful first night in his new home.

CHECKLIST – YOUR PUPPY’S FIRST TIME HOME

Potty outside, then find a suitable spot

Start slowly with a puppy-proof area.

Begin with one-on-1 introductions

Make sure you enforce the rules early

Good Night, Sleep tight! Sleeping with your Puppy

The first night of bringing home a puppy can be difficult, just like the birth of a baby. You can make sure that you have a great night with your new puppy by following these steps before and after you bring your pup home.

SET UP HIS ROOM – WHERE SHOULD MY PUPPY SLEEP?

Everyone wants their own place to rest and sleep well, and that includes puppies. It is his bedroom and should be set up before he gets in. When you return home, put a blanket, a t-shirt, and some toys in his kennel. After letting him explore the area, you can put him in there for a few minutes to make sure that he is comfortable. To make the kennel darker and more secure, you can also drape a blanket around it. However, this may require some trial and error.

POTTY BEFORE BEDTIME

Before you go to bed, take your dog outside to use the restroom. Be patient and give the command. Your puppy may take some time to learn the area you have chosen for their potty.

SETTING A ROUTINE -POTTY SCHEDULE: HOW LONG SHOULD PUPPIES Sleep?

After the dog has gone outside, you can set up the nightly routine. Give the command to put your dog in a kennel, or crate. Give them plenty of time to obey. You can reinforce those rules by giving them a small treat. It is a great time to say goodnight and turn off the lights.

You should be able to get your puppy to sleep through the night between 10-12 weeks of age. Puppies sleep for 15-20 hours per day. They will be able to sleep through the night once they have settled in to their routine and become comfortable with their new surroundings.

CRYING Himself TO SLEEP – SHOULD MY PUPPY CRY AT NIGHT?

Your best friend is the one who shuts off the lights and runs away from you. That’s the worst thing that you could imagine. Most likely, you’ll cry a bit. That’s how puppies feel. Do not give in to the crying. Reassure them that they can sleep, and allow them to cry until they settle down.

Refrain from letting your puppy sleep in your bed the first night. Although crate training can take time, effort and persistence, it will provide your puppy with a safe place to call their own. If they feel threatened or need a place to rest, they can always go to the kennel or crate. They will not be able to sleep in the bed the first night they move into their new room if you don’t teach them.

MIDNIGHT POTTY BREAKS

Puppy bladders are small and tiny. You will most likely wake up at night to go to the bathroom, especially the first few nights your puppy is home. Listen to him and respond quickly. Be patient and take him outside to use the potty. It is difficult to stay calm and not lose heart during this time. Your puppy will likely run around the yard making laps, which can be quite frustrating at 2:37 AM. You should let him do this and then allow him to go outside when he is ready. This will continue to reinforce the need for the puppy to use the outside potty whenever he needs to.

Reward your puppy with praise after he does his business. Give him some time outside to run around and enjoy the sunshine. This will reinforce the idea that playing outside is good for him as well as for you. He will enjoy it as a fun activity, not a chore.

CHECKLIST: FIRST NIGHT HOME WITH YOUR PUPPY

Install the kennel/crate

Before bedtime, potty

Establish a routine

Let him go to sleep by crying.

As needed, take midnight potty breaks

The First Few Weeks of Adjusting Your Puppy To a New Home

It’s all about adapting when you bring home a puppy. You and your puppy are both adapting to their new environment and to your personality. This adjustment can take some time, so don’t expect to have a perfect puppy in a matter of hours. You can get your puppy on a schedule by being consistent in training and providing reassurance.

CRATE TRAINING FOR YOUR PUPPY

Your puppy’s crate is their safe haven and home. It can be difficult to teach your puppies how to use their crate properly.

Begin by requesting your dog to get into the crate. When they do, give them a treat and shout out loudly. Close the door once they are inside. Close the door and wait until they are quiet before returning. You can encourage them to remain in the kennel until they are quiet enough for you to give your command.

Like babies, puppies need to take naps. This is a good time to take a break from your duties and allow them to play in their crate. You can expect them to cry and fuss when you put them in, but let them adjust and settle down.

FOOD TRAINING

Dogs can become envious of their food, and you need to stop this behavior as soon as possible. Begin by feeding your dog each day one-by-one. You will teach your puppy to share the space and calm down when other people enter.

Limit the amount of food that they eat each day. You can’t resist their puppy-dog eyes, but make sure you keep treats and food out of reach of prying teeth.

Although you may love hamburgers and fries, your dog won’t eat them. Avoid giving your puppy food from other people as this can cause digestive problems. You can reward your puppy with appropriate treats of the right size if you feel the need.

Finally, you should set a schedule for your dog’s food. You can control how much food your dog eats and when they go potty.

DOG TO DOG TRAINING- SOCIALISING YOUR PUPPY

You may feel like you have too many dogs or puppies. If you are introducing your puppy to an older dog, it can be overwhelming. Your older dog might feel like he has been invaded by this new puppy, just as your puppy is settling in to his new home. Training both your pet and your puppy can help keep the hair-raising antics to a minimum.

Introduce your older dog to your puppy in a neutral area like a yard or an anteroom. It is a great way to let them get to know each other and understand their intentions. If your big dog starts to fight with you or become aggressive towards your puppy, keep him on a leash.

Your dogs can become more comfortable with one another by being in a puppy-proof or dog gate area. While your puppy is safe in his own area, he can still “talk” to his older sibling while they become more familiar with each other.

You or another trusted person in your family should monitor any interaction between your older dog, and your puppy. Older dogs will soon learn to accept the puppy as a friend and can play with the puppy and be happy. However, if they are annoyed or upset they may lash out. In case of an emergency, don’t let young children see your dogs interact with each other.

POTTY TRAINING FOR YOUR PUPPY

This is the hardest one! It can take a while to train your dog to potty. Some dogs will be able to do it in as little as a few weeks, while others may need months. Patience, consistency, rewards, and patience are the keys to housetraining your furry friend.

Your puppy should be taken out immediately he leaves the kennel, and before he goes to sleep at night. To make sure your puppy doesn’t have an accident in new territory, you’ll want to confine him to his puppy-proof zone.

After each play session, and any time of excitement, take your puppy outside to use the potty. Sometimes puppies can’t control their bladders, and they forget to go outside when it’s too late. After all the excitement, take them outside to remind them that they must go outside.

Finally, let them go to the toilet about 30 minutes after eating. This is the time it takes for them to digest. Waiting too long could result in piles of food all over your house.

Positive reinforcement is a way to reward your dog after a successful trip outdoors. Reward your pup for their accomplishments with praise, head pet, and good treats!

CHECKLIST – FIRST FEW WEEKS WITH YOUR NEW PUPPY

Crate training will help you sleep well at night.

You must work hard to train your dog to use the potty.

Make sure your dog has a regular food intake

Introduce them slowly to your senior dog

Takeaways

You are making one of the most important investments in your life. Your puppy will be your companion for the rest of your life. You want to get off to a good start in this journey.

Your puppy should be introduced slowly to his new family and home.

Your puppy will be able to process all of the surroundings without becoming overwhelmed if you take things slowly. After he’s been introduced, and you have settled him into your home, you can start training him with the crate and house training, and you can also establish a feeding schedule. Contact your vet to arrange for your puppy’s first shot. Also, check out local training classes and trainers to help them socialize with other dogs.

 

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